Male-dominated workplaces biggest threat to women's careers, says report

4/26/2013

New research has suggested that the biggest threat to women in the workplace is a male-dominated corporate culture, according to harveynash.com.

The study was carried out by executive search firm Harvey Nash and board Network Inspire. The companies analysed 600 directors, CEOs and senior executives as part of the data.

Results of the research showed that a quarter of respondents thought male-dominated workforces were the biggest barrier in the workplace. More than a half also claimed that this factor is also reducing the amount of time a woman stays at a company and tries to further her career.

Carol Rosati, co-founder of Inspire and director of Harvey Nash, claimed that employers needed to adapt ways of working based on gender. She told hrmagazine.co.uk: "Organisations are failing to recognise that in today's world, employees of all genders want different ways of working."

She added: "A more enlightened approach to managing all employees will help re-balance the gender in the talent pipeline, but also create a more productive workforce and improve retention."

Ms Rosati also said that initiatives which would help in navigating through uncertainty when it came to female retention didn't have to be expensive, however she said firms do need to start changing how they operate if they want to see a difference.

Data from the survey also showed that 60 per cent of senior executives from the survey said their productivity would increase if their companies helped them achieve a better work/life balance. Women also said they would stay longer at a company if there was an improved culture (52 per cent), flexible working (36 per cent) and the removal of unconscious bias in the workplace (23 per cent).











Topics: Getting Ahead